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Epazote

* Also known as Pazote, Epasote and Pasote

Epazote (eh-pah-ZOE-teh) Chenopodium ambrosioides grows wild in the US as well as Mexico, the Mexican name derives from the Aztec (Nahuatl) word epazotl meaning skunk. This is a very strong smelling plant and it bears long, pointy, serrated leaves. Epazote was brought to Europe in the 17th century from Mexico and used in various traditional medicines. The herb was used by the Aztecs as a medicine as well as a culinary herb.

Best known for helping to flavor and reduce the gassy effect of beans, Epazote is commonly used in a variety of dishes including salsas in Mexico, Central and South America. Due to the presence of many aromatic compounds but especially ascaridole Epazote is used to kill intestinal parasites. Epazote can be toxic especially to pregnant women so it should be used in small quantities, when used as recommended a flavoring agent in food it is safe.

Mexican Black Beans with Epazote Recipe

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 pound dried black beans
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon dried Epazote*
  • 1/2 pound chopped fresh chorizo sausage
  • 1 diced onion
  • 2 diced carrots
  • 2 diced celery stalks
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon ancho or New Mexico chile powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
*Epazote can tied in a piece of muslin or cotton cloth to keep the fibrous stems out of your dish.
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Soak black beans overnight in cold water to cover. Drain and rinse.
  2. Preheat the oven to 300F. Place the beans, chicken stock and water, and Epazote in a Dutch oven. Bring to a boil on the stove top, skim off foam, then cover and bake for 1 1/2 hours.
  3. In a large, heavy skillet, brown chorizo sausage. Remove the chorizo, leaving the fat in the pan. Add onion, carrots, celery stalks, and garlic to the pan and cook over medium heat until the vegetables become soft.
  4. Remove the pot of beans from the oven and stir in the vegetables and chorizo, along with ancho or New Mexico chile powder, ground cumin, and salt to taste.
  5. Cover and bake for 1 hour, or until the beans are soft.
Epazote (eh-pah-ZOE-teh)
Latin Name: Chenopodium ambrosioides
Common Name: American wormseed
*Also called Pazote, Epasote and Pasote

Epazote grows wild in the US as well as Mexico, the Mexican name derives from the Aztec (Nahuatl) word epazotl meaning skunk. This is a very strong smelling plant and it bears long, pointy, serrated leaves. This herb is in the Amaranth family and the genus of Chenopodiacea (Spinach genus). Epazote was taken to Europe in the 17th century from Mexico and used in various traditional medicines. The herb was used by the Aztecs as a medicine as well as a culinary herb.

Best known for helping to flavor and reduce the gassy effect of beans, Epazote is commonly used in a variety of dishes including salsas in Mexico, Central and South America. Due to the presence of many aromatic compounds but especially ascaridole, Epazote is used to kill intestinal parasites. Epazote can be toxic especially to pregnant women so it should be used in small quantities, when used as recommended in food it is safe.

Come by Taos Herb Company for a free recipe using Epazote.

Epazote

Price: $2.70



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